tend

tend, attend, mind, watch are comparable when they mean to take charge of or look after someone or something especially as a duty or in return for remuneration. Tend usually retains some notion of an earlier sense in which it means to pay attention; hence, it is appropriately used in situations to which this notion is relevant. Often it is used in reference to menial, unskilled, or routine employments and then typically takes for its object something that requires attention (as in anticipating wishes or needs, looking out for accidents, mishaps, or signs of danger, or maintaining effective mechanical operation); thus, one who tends a lock is employed to work the devices adjusting the level of the water in the canal when a boat approaches; a shepherd is one who tends a flock of sheep; a stoker tends a furnace and supplies it with fuel when needed
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standard roses tended by her hands— Meredith

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Tend is used in reference to the care of persons when a menial or a ministering rather than a professional relationship is implied
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employ a girl to tend to the children for a few hours each day

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Sacrificing her leisure to tend the sick and helpless poor in their homes

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Attend, which is more likely to be colored by a sense meaning to take charge, is appropriate when the services given are of a professional character or are the prerogatives of a post that one holds as a mark of honor or merit
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the new doctor attended the governor in his last illness

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Mind is closer to tend than to attend, but it distinctively suggests a guarding or protecting (as from harm, injury, or failure)
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a neighbor minds the children when their mother is at work

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the men . . . were gone to dinner: I stayed to mind the furnace— Edgeworth

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Watch (see also SEE 2) may come close to mind, but it tends to imply a more constant or more professional relationship and to suggest a more definite need of vigilance and usually the intention of forestalling danger
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employed a man to watch the factory when the machines were idle

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wilt thou receive this weighty trust when I am o'er the sea? To watch and ward my castle strong, and to protect my land— Scott

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Analogous words: *defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard: *nurse, nurture, foster, cherish, cultivate

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • tend — tend …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • tend — [ tend ] verb *** 1. ) intransitive to usually do a particular thing: tend to do something: He tends to exaggerate. The gym tends to get very busy at around six o clock. We tend to take technology for granted nowadays. These arguments tend merely …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Tend — Tend, v. i. [F. tendre, L. tendere, tensum and tentum, to stretch, extend, direct one s course, tend; akin to Gr. ? to stretch, Skr. tan. See {Thin}, and cf. {Tend} to attend, {Contend}, {Intense}, {Ostensible}, {Portent}, {Tempt}, {Tender} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tend — Tend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tending}.] [Aphetic form of attend. See {Attend}, {Tend} to move, and cf. {Tender} one that tends or attends.] 1. To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tend — W1S1 [tend] v [Sense: 1, 3, 5; Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: tendre to stretch , from Latin tendere] [Sense: 2, 4; Date: 1100 1200; Origin: attend] 1.) tend to do sth if something tends to happen, it happens often and is likely to happen …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tend — tend1 [tend] vt. [ME tenden, aphetic < attenden: see ATTEND] 1. to take care of; minister to; watch over; look after; attend to [to tend plants or animals, to tend the sick] 2. to be in charge of or at work at; manage or operate [to tend a… …   English World dictionary

  • tend — /tend/ verb 1 tend to do sth to often do a particular thing, especially something that is bad or annoying, and to be likely to do it again: Sally tends to interfere in other people s business. | The car does tend to overheat. 2 tend towards sth… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • tend*/*/*/ — [tend] verb 1) [I] to usually do a particular thing He tends to exaggerate.[/ex] I tend not to go out so much in the winter.[/ex] 2) [I/T] to take care of someone or something Eddie kept himself busy tending the garden.[/ex] Doctors were tending… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • Tend — Tend, v. i. 1. To wait, as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend; with on or upon. [1913 Webster] Was he not companion with the riotous knights That tend upon my father? Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. [F. attendre.] To await; to expect. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tend — Ⅰ. tend [1] ► VERB 1) frequently behave in a particular way or have a certain characteristic. 2) go or move in a particular direction. ORIGIN Latin tendere stretch, tend . Ⅱ. tend [2] ► …   English terms dictionary

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